Measuring the Return on Character

Source: Harvard Business Review

When we hear about unethical executives whose careers and companies have gone down in flames, it’s sadly unsurprising. Hubris and greed have a way of catching up with people, who then lose the power and wealth they’ve so fervently pursued. But is the opposite also true? Do highly principled leaders and their organizations perform especially well?

They do, according to a new study by KRW International, a Minneapolis-based leadership consultancy. The researchers found that CEOs whose employees gave them high marks for character had an average return on assets of 9.35% over a two-year period. That’s nearly five times as much as what those with low character ratings had; their ROA averaged only 1.93%.

Read more


Companies at a crossroads

As in the previous years, the challenge of finding the right employees is still one of the main priorities for companies, no matter the industry they are active in or the quality of their employ..

Read More
September marvels. Enescu Festival and School Principals

Living through the marvel of the Enescu Festival these past few days, I started to reflect on what positive leadership means: action, willingness to do good and humbleness among others.

Read More
Managing Anxiety & Stress in Leadership Roles – Highlights

Some quick highlights from our executive education program in July.

Read More
5 questions with Adam Leonard

Adam Leonard from Google and one of the speakers of our event answers some questions about flow, the benefits it brings and the challenges people face when trying to get into a flow state.

Read More