Measuring the Return on Character

Source: Harvard Business Review

When we hear about unethical executives whose careers and companies have gone down in flames, it’s sadly unsurprising. Hubris and greed have a way of catching up with people, who then lose the power and wealth they’ve so fervently pursued. But is the opposite also true? Do highly principled leaders and their organizations perform especially well?

They do, according to a new study by KRW International, a Minneapolis-based leadership consultancy. The researchers found that CEOs whose employees gave them high marks for character had an average return on assets of 9.35% over a two-year period. That’s nearly five times as much as what those with low character ratings had; their ROA averaged only 1.93%.

Read more


Leave A Comment

A Checklist on Feedback and Conflict Management

Feedback – a sensitive subject at both ends. A difficult thing to do but among the most efficient in developing a culture of respect and trust.

Read More
Do good, give, Inspire!

On May 23rd we hosted a one-day executive program in Bucharest, the first in a series of events with top business schools executives centered on our mission: helping companies live th..

Read More
The end of the HR function as we know it?

Two years ago, I wrote an article about “the end of Executive Search as we know it” mentioning the fact that I considered that even the name of the industry was inappropriate while t..

Read More
Customized Individual Development. A key to becoming an employer of choice – part II

In the first part of our article we talked about how you can generate a development program that is tailored to the strengths and areas for leadership growth with the help of a thorough assessme..

Read More